Reverso Blog

Keep up with the current news, products and articles from Reverso.

Top Reverso Products from IBEX 2016

Tiffany T. - Thursday, October 13, 2016
top product header

At the show, we presented a wide variety of products that make engine maintenance easier. These are our top 3 products that attendees favored the most.


flushing system image
  Automatic Outboard Flushing System

Flush all outboard motors on a timer. After the single hose connection, press  start, and the system delivers freshwater to each outboard motor–one at a time. More info.
impeller pump image   OP-7 Oil Change Pump

Drain and fill with a lightweight and fast 7 gallon per minute impeller pump. More info.
oil change system image   Oil Change System

Make oil changes cleaner, faster, and easier for the engine, transmission, and generator. Drain oil and fill new oil with the same reversible pump. More info.

GenEquip Completes Maintenance with Portable Pump System

Tiffany T. - Monday, April 25, 2016
oil change pump setup with hoses
connected to Kohler generator OP-6 with hoses


Photo Credit: GenQuip

Genquip is using the Reverso OP-6 oil change pump to drain and fill new oil into a Kohler 500KW generator with Volvo engine. They completed the pump with 5/8" custom aeroquip hoses and quick connect fittings to move the oil easily and cleanly from a container. The OP-6 is an easy 7 lbs to carry to the service site.

GenQuip sells and services generators for home and industrial business. You can visit their site at www.genquipservice.com



 

Three Point Approach to Fuel Cleanliness

Tiffany T. - Monday, March 07, 2016
Author: Jessica Fernandes

chart for three points

When it comes to diesel fuel cleanliness, there is no "one size fits all" solution. The solution is based on the needs. To understand the needs, you have to understand what the goal of the person or organization is regarding fuel cleanliness. What is it they are trying to accomplish? Are they trying to meet an ISO spec? Are they trying to reduce or eliminate water?

A simple, reliable way to know what issues exist is by conducting a fuel test. Fuel testing provides an indication of what is causing the diesel fuel to be unstable, be it water, sludge, or a combination of the two. Once it has been determined what the issue is, you can begin to create a solution to resolve it.

This is where the three point approach to fuel cleanliness is most useful. A solution is most effective when it encompasses all three tools. The first tool is a fuel polishing system which moves the failure point from the engine or equipment being fueled to the fuel storage tank. Better stated, address the poor fuel quality before it reaches the critical equipment.

The second tool is in line filtration which is installed in line, just before the on-engine fuel system. This provides a secondary failure point, again before the fuel reaches the critical equipment.

The third tool is fuel additive or stabilizer. This is used to stabilize fuel in harsh weather and remove emulsified water. These three tools, when used together, guarantee the cleanest diesel fuel, in turn protecting engines from damage and ensuring reliability of the equipment.

For more information on fuel cleanliness, please contact Reverso Pumps at contact@reversopumps.com. More information can also be found on our website at www.reversopumps.com.

Original article from: LinkedIn

Welcome Our New Industrial Sales Manager

Tiffany T. - Monday, February 22, 2016

Reverso Pumps, Inc., the leading manufacturer of oil change systems, pumps, fuel primers and fuel polishing systems, has appointed Jessica Fernandes to the position of Industrial Sales Manager. While she has a background in working with customers in all industries, her focus is diesel filtration for engine systems and long-term storage in construction, agricultural and power generation applications.


She will represent Reverso products through quality account management and education on the increased reliability through preventative maintenance. Coming from the power generation market, she has over five years experience in business development and managing client expectations. Her industry involvement combined with her account management skills makes her a valuable asset to the Reverso team.


To contact Jessica Fernandes for inquires, send your request to jessicaf@reversopumps.com

Click here to download the complete press release. Media Contact: graphics@reversopumps.com



Jessica Fernandes photo
 

Filtering the Market

Tiffany T. - Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Separ Filter is the primary filtration in all of Reverso's fuel polishing systems. Get to know more about their presence in the North and South American market with their latest profile in Energy & Mining International's Summer 2013 Vol 2 issue.

 

A Complete Solution for Fuel Tank Sludge

Tiffany T. - Friday, April 12, 2013

The following article is provided by CAT's Electric Power Advisor website. Click here to see original article.

"Preventive maintenance for generator sets should include a check of fuel condition. Clean fuel going into a tank does not assure clean fuel coming out. Condensation can occur in fuel tanks, whether a generator set is in regular use or sits idle for lengthy periods. Microbial growth can occur with the buildup of water. As the microbes feed on fuel and water, waste falls to the bottom of the tank. These microbial droppings are sometimes referred to as algae growth, but it bears no resemblance to real algae. It is sludge-like in nature and acidic, and can cause significant damage to engines.

This waste material can not only clog fuel filters, it can damage fuel injectors, causing downtime and expensive repairs. There is only one complete way to clean your fuel of microbial sludge – fuel polishing. Before discussing polishing, consider the drawbacks to partial steps that are not as effective. You can drain water and sludge from the bottom of the fuel tank or put biocides in the tank. Draining the tank removes most of the sludge but doesn’t remove entrained water, allowing new microbial growth. Biocides kill microbes but do not address the issue of existing sludge. And when additional fuel is added to the tank, the sludge is re-suspended.

With stricter environmental requirements, tight fuel system tolerances and pressures approaching 30-thousand psi, the smallest of contaminants or emulsified water can damage the fuel injectors and/or clog fuel filters. Fuel polishing removes the particulate matter and entrained water to greatly reduce the possibility of damage to fuel system parts. The process essentially loops diesel fuel out of and back into the fuel tank. There are three stages as the fuel is looped through the system – a centrifuge, a conditioning magnet and filters. By using this complete process to treat fuel, you eliminate the need to drain tanks.

You can make arrangements to polish fuel in one of two ways. You can add a polishing unit to your tank on site or you can include the process in preventive maintenance agreements to be performed at prescribed times. Either way, the cost is relatively inexpensive when compared to the damage the contaminated fuel can do to engines, and the cost of renting generator sets when downtime occurs.

When you consider fuel polishing, remember to use a system that includes all three stages of treatment. Some competitive offerings simply put a hose on the bottom of tanks and suck sludge from the bottom. As mentioned earlier, that is not a total solution and certainly does not remove entrained water. Remember, fuel polishing does not replace, but rather augments the filtering of fuel as it enters the tank.

Fuel polishing is an important part of your fuel quality management and will help generator sets perform up to expectations, giving you fewer worries.  Please contact us for more information.

A special thanks to Dennis Albers with Carter Machinery for their participation in the development of this article."

Fall Sale - On the Products You Really Need

Tammy Anstett - Thursday, November 01, 2012

Stop by our Sale page this month for outstanding deals on some of our best-selling items. Hurry - these prices are for a limited-time only.

 

Gear Pump 311 AC - Light Duty is a self-priming gear pump that can be used for diesel, oil, and water.

120V, 60 Hz with Reversing Switch (28-3399)    List Price $580    Sale Price $295
120V, 60 Hz with On/Off Switch (28-3401)          List Price $580    Sale Price $295 

 

Gear Pump 312 - Medium Duty is a self-priming gear pump for oil, diesel or water with a reversing switch.


12V with Reversing Switch (30-2239)    List Price $579    Sale Price $289

24V with Reversing Switch (30-2240)    List Price $579    Sale Price $289

 

Oil Change 3010 - Light Duty fast lube oil change system with a gear pump. One of our TOP selling versions on sale!!

12V with 3 Valves (42-2343)    List Price $675    Sale Price $337.50
24V with 3 Valves (42-2353)    List Price $675    Sale Price $337.50

Oil Change 700 - Heavy Duty fast lube oil change system 700 Series with gear pump.

24V with 5 Valves (44-2409)    List Price $1529    Sale Price $764.50

UPDATE: SALE EXPIRED

Fuel Polishing - Keeping Genset Fuel Flowing During Disasters

Tammy Anstett - Friday, June 10, 2011
Keeping Genset Fuel Flowing During Disasters
Developing A Strategy To Ensure The Availability Of Fuel For Your Generator System Is A Key Element Of Disaster Planning.

By Robert M. Menuet, PE, GHT Limited, Arlington, Va.
06/01/2011

Originally published at: Consulting-Specifying Engineer

Mr. Menuet states that as part of your disaster plans you should "consider installing a fuel filtering or polishing system that will remove moisture and help prevent fuel degradation. Sediment that can build up in the bottom of storage tanks can be stirred up when fuel is delivered, often resulting in clogged filters and injectors, or decreased engine performance.

Fuel polishing and filtration helps minimize this buildup. Also consider fuel additives that will prolong fuel life, suspend contaminants so they can be trapped by the system filters, protect against corrosion, and prevent biological growths."

To view the article in its entirety, read below or click here.



Full Article
Our commercial, government, and institutional operations depend on the continuous availability of electrical power to run critical equipment. Prolonged, large-scale power outages, though rare, have significant financial and service delivery impacts. You need to be ready when disaster strikes.

Disasters vary in type and severity. Fuel supply planning for local severe weather events and regional blackouts is vastly different from the strategies required to defend against an unforeseeable terrorist attack or an extraordinary natural catastrophe such as Hurricane Katrina. The considerations outlined in this article are intended to guide you through the planning process to defend against reasonably predictable disasters.

Diesel vs. natural gas

Diesel-fueled generators are better suited for larger power requirements than natural gas-powered generators, yet require more physical space and maintenance to sustain a reliable fuel source. Building owners typically select natural gas generators when they require a lower initial capital investment and prefer not to maintain an on-site fuel supply.

Because natural gas is supplied by the local utility and delivered underground, the primary factor that building owners can control in relation to disaster defense is the purchase of non-interruptible service. Your utility will typically charge a slightly higher rate in exchange for a guarantee of fuel availability during a local disaster event, but many owners find this preferable to managing a diesel fuel supply for their generator.

When choosing between natural gas and diesel, it is important to note that natural gas generators may not satisfy local life safety requirements. If the utility source is not deemed reliable for emergency operations by the local authority, diesel engine generators are generally the only practical alternative.

For buildings that shelter critical business functions or have other high availability requirements, the decision to use an on-site diesel-powered generator is often made as part of overall disaster planning. Once this choice is made, there are numerous factors that can influence the configuration of the fuel supply. Considerations that can make this process more manageable include:

  • Fuel quantity
  • Refueling availability
  • Storage and compartmentation
  • Fuel quality
  • Safety and security

Fuel quantity

Identifying the amount of fuel needed to power your critical equipment during a reasonably predictable natural catastrophe is the first step. A rough consumption calculation for diesel generators is 7 gallons of fuel per hour for each 100 kW of generator rating; i.e., a 200 kW generator would consume 14 gallons of diesel fuel per hour. A typical goal for on-site storage is three days’ worth of fuel. A site requiring a 2 MW generator installation should have approximately 10,000 gallons of available stored fuel to provide a three-day supply. To ensure the necessary amount is on hand in the event of a disaster, you should factor engine exercising into your equation, and understand that refilling a partially depleted storage tank may not be practical until sufficient fuel is depleted to justify a fuel delivery. Purchase a storage system that will accommodate your disaster-threshold fuel plus the amount you will consume for engine testing as part of regular maintenance.

When determining the amount of fuel to store on-site, you must consider the criticality of your location and the nature of your operation at the site. If your facility provides critical functions required for your business that are not duplicated in another location, a larger quantity of fuel should be considered to ensure continued operations during an extended power outage. Consider the impact an extended utility outage would have on your organization’s bottom line. The data center of an online retailer would likely face far greater revenue losses during an extended power outage than the administrative office of a sales force that telecommutes and travels on a regular basis. Storing fuel can be expensive, so a business case should be developed that considers capital expenses and risk factors. Weigh the installation costs and maintenance requirements of storing fuel against the financial impacts of downtime—including the direct costs of lost revenue, recovery of operations, and the potential loss of customers.

According to the American Red Cross, “As many as 40% of small businesses do not reopen after a major disaster like a flood, tornado, or earthquake. These shuttered businesses were unprepared for a disaster; they had no plan or backup systems.”

Refueling availability

Refueling availability will impact your decision on how much fuel to store on-site. Is it financially and logistically feasible to store all or some of the desired amount in your building or on your property? Can you arrange to have a supplier outside of the region bring fuel when needed? In the second scenario, the fuel supplier down the street may be affected by the same natural disaster, so arranging delivery assurances from several geographically disparate suppliers may make sense. Selecting remote suppliers that use different transportation routes can further ensure refueling availability when a disaster has a widespread impact. Typically it is not practical—logistically or economically—to store more than several days’ supply on-site, so a balance between on-site storage and delivery assurances from suppliers should position you to survive an extended loss of electrical power.

Storage and Compartmentation

On-Site Storage—For the fuel you store on-site, the first consideration is conforming to local and state codes, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations, and National Fire Protection Association guidelines. Codes are intended to safeguard buildings and their occupants, while EPA is primarily concerned with the environmental impact of spills. Sustainable design certifications that encompass building energy usage, such as the U.S. Green Building Council LEED program, may also influence how much and where the fuel is stored.

The amount of on-site fuel storage will likely dictate storage locations and configurations. Large amounts of fuel are typically stored outside the building, either in above- or below-ground tanks. Below-grade storage requires EPA compliance for leak monitoring, and may necessitate groundwater monitoring and other spill detection methods. Local and state codes may have additional requirements for outdoor storage solutions.

For outdoor generators, engineers often specify that the fuel be stored in belly tanks under the generator. This can be a convenient, space-saving option, though there is a practical limit to the amount of fuel a belly tank can hold. If a tank is too large, stairs, platforms, or ladders may be required to gain access to service the generator. If a belly tank is too small, your operating time will be limited if it is your only method of storage. Discuss these considerations with your operations and maintenance staff.

In-building storage may be the best solution for smaller amounts of stored fuel. It also offers better protection from temperature fluctuations, weather events, and tampering. An example from Hurricane Katrina illustrates this point. As noted in “FAILURE OF INITIATIVE: Final Report of the Select Bipartisan Committee to Investigate the Preparation for and Response to Hurricane Katrina,” “Many of the parish EOCs [Emergency Operations Centers] and public safety facilities were wiped out or flooded. Jefferson Parish…was in better shape to respond because it had protected its EOC. Jefferson Parish Emergency Manager Dr. Walter Maestri explained the EOC was in a hardened facility—an old incinerator with cement walls—with the command center, living quarters, and emergency generator all on upper floors...[and] it was able to keep operating at some level.”

Fuel stored within your facility will require compliance with building codes, local and state codes, and building insurance requirements. Building and structure insurance policies often have strict requirements for the type and amount of fuel and storage equipment.

Compartmentation—While compliance with building codes and other mandatory requirements will result in a safe installation, there are other choices a user can make to improve the availability of the stored fuel. Compartmentation can help safeguard some or all of your reserve if a single localized event occurs, such as an explosion or fire. With compartmentation, the total amount of fuel is divided among multiple tanks. Fire- and blast-resistant separating-structures ensure there are barriers between tanks to prevent a local event from affecting the entire supply.

Compartmentation also supports the availability of backup fuel if one tank develops quality problems. Also, the use of multiple storage vessels helps limit cross-contamination should one tank be replenished with contaminated fuel.

Fuel quality

If you store fuel on-site, consider installing a fuel filtering or polishing system that will remove moisture and help prevent fuel degradation. Sediment that can build up in the bottom of storage tanks can be stirred up when fuel is delivered, often resulting in clogged filters and injectors, or decreased engine performance.

Fuel polishing and filtration helps minimize this buildup. Also consider fuel additives that will prolong fuel life, suspend contaminants so they can be trapped by the system filters, protect against corrosion, and prevent biological growths.

Temperature Considerations—Atmospheric temperatures can affect fuel quality. At approximately 30 F, fuel begins to cloud as the paraffin in the fuel starts to solidify. At 15 F, this solidification can turn into wax and can be severe enough to clog filters in the system.

Most providers offer winter blends designed to minimize clouding. If financial or logistical reasons necessitate the use of a summer blend fuel as you enter colder weather, other strategies to prevent this problem include additives, heat trace of piping, and immersion tank heaters.

Safety and security

Ensuring the safety of building occupants and the security of your fuel supply is fairly straightforward. During facility design, provide a rated room for fuel and generators stored in the building. Locate it near a loading dock or other low-traffic area, and provide controlled access. When using outdoor storage, critical facilities will likely have perimeter security in place to safeguard their fuel supply and generators. For less intensive facilities, secure walls or fencing around the fuel storage tanks is the most common protection strategy.

Planning ahead

It is impossible to predict every disaster scenario that could impact your fuel supply. But with early, careful planning, you can determine the amount, availability, storage, protection, and quality of a fuel supply that can support your operations through many of the most common natural catastrophes that occur in your region. A balanced strategy that considers costs and risks will ensure the success of your plan.
*****************
Menuet is a senior principal with GHT Limited, where he focuses on the design of mission-critical facilities for many clients with high availability needs. A professional engineer with more than 26 years of experience, he earned a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Virginia.

Fuel Polishing question - Injector Failures

Tammy Anstett - Thursday, May 05, 2011
A common question we receive:
…“One of the worst problems we face with the reliability of our engines is the effect of bad fuel on the fuel injection system. This is true for most diesel engine manufacturers that make use of the latest technology in their electronically controlled engines. Although the manufacturer specifies water separators as primary fuel filtration (10 microns) and a 2 micron high efficiency secondary fuel filter system, we still have issues (even using the fuel they recommend) due to the quality of the fuel that is standard in our environment… We find that even with the best precaution methods, injectors have premature failures due to free water that bypasses all the systems in place. What else can we do to reduce system failures due to fuel?”
– Application Engineer

Answer:
We understand your problem and agree that today’s high-tech engine fuel systems have an Achilles Heel - Water.

Our fuel polishing systems, utilizing Separ Filters, remove up to 99.9% of all water and particulate. The best way to illustrate the need for and success of these systems is to showcase the following case. This photo below is from the U.S. Embassy in the UAE taken by Embassy staff.

Their problem was similar to yours in that they had fuel deliveries that were badly contaminated with water. This water destroyed several Cummins injection pumps and countless injectors. The picture (below) is the before and after just one (1) pass through our fuel polishing system. Since they started using the Portable Cart system, they have not had a single fuel-system related failure.







Fuel Polishing question - Effective Fuel Management - You Need a Plan

Tammy Anstett - Wednesday, May 04, 2011
Storage of diesel is often an overlooked area – a popular misconception is that diesel fuel is “good for life”.
The reality is very different.

To fully understand the issues at play, it is worth taking into account several areas:
• The Diesel fuel quality standard
• The specification of supplied diesel
• Known issues
• Recommendations from the fuel supplier
• Discovering issues before they become problems
• Short and long term solutions

To look at these issues, we have been in conversation with BP and have utilised their available library of fuel data.

To see the full report, click here.




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